Well, last night I joined in an event that I won’t soon forget.  In case you missed it (and I almost did) U2 broadcast their concert from the Rosebowl LA last night online via YouTube live for the world to watch – and FREE.  As I watched it really felt like a new dawn (although it actually was very late for me) with many technologies coming of age over past years were put to full test to share an experience globally.

First a note on how I found out about this.  Maybe my head had been in the sand, but I was not aware of this event until shortly before when I saw notes coming across my twitter feeds (which is quickly becoming my news and information source).  I am no U2 expert or even one who follows them closely, but I recall many of their songs from my youth and thought this might be fun to watch – I had no idea what I was in for!

I followed a link and logged online and within minutes the band took the stage around 12am EST.  Now this being U2, many expect nothing short of a great show.  Certainly for those attending live in LA the show had too have been phenomenal considering the stage, lights, 360 degree rotating screens, energy, etc – the list goes on.

But what about those of us watching online? Generally the online community ends up getting the “scraps” when its a live broadcast as the show is produced for the live audience.

Not this show!  The sound quality was incredible – mixed well, clear, crisp.  The video production was also great.  I watched it full-screen and the clarity was superb almost the entire time providing incredible camera angles and effects to bring the show home to me.  The online broadcast worked for me without any issues, which seems like a major accomplishment as I assume quite a few were watching globally.  I definitely felt like a 1st class participant receiving the same attention to quality as those in attendance.

While I’m no expert in U2 songs, I did hear messages tonight touching on violence, war, sickness, and most importantly God.  They sang one of my favorite songs – Amazing Grace as an intro to “Where the streets have no name.”  It was incredible hearing a message being sung for the world of God’s love and grace for all of us even though we are all lost and blind.  I know that God’s love can move mountains in our world of pain and brokenness.

And beyond watching and listening was the social experience.  The twitter feeds were alive with posts in various languages across the globe.  Folks were posting where they were watching from and the band referenced several remote simulcast (I think).  Having a global audience U2 used this experience to communicate on important social issues including hunger and democracy!  They had Nelson Mandela talk via video and a special focus on the Burmese democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi even providing everyone signs to hold up.  At one point they also spoke directly to anyone who might be online from Iran.  And there was what appeared to be a live message from the international space station.

My only negative was Bono at one point took an American flag from an assistant and opened it up on the stage floor and was nearly laying/walking on it.  I don’t think Bono was trying to be disparaging, but this is definitely not a proper handling of our flag.

I’m not personally equipped to gauge the impact this event may yield – but realizing that folks across the globe were watching left me feeling at a minimum there may be someone watching who is facing repression and who may have received encouragement.  And for those of us living in freedom it was an important reminder of the value of our freedom and life battle that others face for their own freedom.

In case you missed it – here is the YouTube link where it will be rebroadcast –  http://www.youtube.com/user/U2official

If you’re an audiophile you may enjoy this post on the sound setup – http://clairglobal.com/u2/

Is Twitter poised to become a public enterprise message bus enabling a new range of transactional applications?  You can already see this happening with new on-line services/applications which (following your registration) monitor your twitter feed for specific/tagged data which is captured for use within the application.

For example http://www.fuelfrog.com/ will collect your auto fuel and mileage information – which you publish with your mobile twitter client when you are filling up.

The uses could become far reaching.   Some examples might include

  • Manage expenses real-time using twitter
  • Manage contacts & calendar events
  • New (enhanced) “devices” which publish transactional information for your use by applications

The simplicity, universal access and proven scale of Twitter are part of what make this possible.  It has a rich set of mobile clients making it very practical to participate in real-time from anywhere.   Twitter is continuing to support significant growth with fewer down times.  And Twitter provides a simple yet powerful public API allowing applications to connect.

One big challenge is privacy.   Currently Twitter status updates are wide open (unless you password protect) and expect you don’t want this type of data public, nor would your followers want to be distracted by it.  Maybe a feature allowing a category to be associated with updates (default would be status) and then clients could leverage this in queries to filter data messages.   Or maybe the direct messages could be leveraged – however this would be limiting as it prevents multiple applications from receiving an update.

Could this be in the future of Twitter?   I think the possibilities would be exciting especially with the rapid explosion of mobile devices with application stores and on-line services.

Finally had one of those “ah-ha” moments to appreciate how micro-blogging (Twitter, Yammer, etc) is basically “hall conversation meets the internet!”

In years past much collaboration occurred in the halls at work (or around the coffee machine).   During these ad-hoc discussions folks share what they are working on, maybe something new they have seen, possibly even something personal.   Key was short and often disjoint bits of information, but often valuable to your work.  As you would come and go you would pick up parts, some days more than others and might followup on something you heard.  

And then there was Twitter… and Yammer…

These new technologies and communities provide almost an electronic “coffee machine” around which discussion occurs.  While it took me a short while to appreciate and understand, this is clearly part of the significant change underway in how the internet is used.  And now the field of scope from whom I can have ad-hoc conversations has grown to be global.  This is really exciting – I can see this filling a critical gap in distributed work environments. 

So is there a negative?   Does this promote further distancing in folks from developing good interpersonal skills?   Take a look at this article at mashup http://mashable.com/2009/02/10/mobile-dating-stats